Origin of Oncotarget and Its Impact on the Field of Medicine

Oncotarget is an open source medical journal that makes weekly publications on the topic of oncology. The online journal operates almost like Wikipedia, on a peer review basis, but has its chief editors as Mikhali Blagosklonny and Andrei Gudkov. It was launched in 2010, and since then has been releasing publications under the umbrella of Impact Journals.

Being an open source platform, Oncotarget is open to all medical practitioners to contribute to the journal as authors. The online editorial team then reviews all submissions and make the necessary adjustments before publishing them online. Besides the subject of Oncology, Oncotarget also accepts publications on the topics of endocrinology, cardiology, Gerotarget, Cell & Moll Biology, general pharmacology, neuropathology, immunology & microbiology and metabolism. Other popular articles on the online journal are on the topic of chromosomes, autophagy and cell death.

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Early evidence of anti-PD-1 activity in enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer

The various publications on Oncotarget have been cited several times in several publications going by the Impact Factor statistics on the website. In 2011, articles from the journal were cited over 493 times achieving an IF of 4.78. The total number of citations rose in 2012, a total of 1450 mentions achieving an impact factor of 6.6. Since then Oncotarget has become a popularly cited journal, with an IF of 6.627 (2217 cites) in 2013, 6.359 (3908 cites) in 2014 and an average IF of 5.008 (10452 cites) in 2015 through 2016.

The first ever findings on the dangers of e-cigarettes to oral health were published on Oncotarget then cited on several health websites. According to the article, though e-cigs have a positive impact on reducing cigarette dependency, the ingredients used to make them were discovered to cause pathogenic oral diseases over time. The flavors and other ingredients will cause inflammation in the mouth and a pro senescence response. Protein cells in the mouth are carbonylated and suffer oxidative stress which not only cause tissue inflammation but also DNA damage. On escalated levels, carbonylation lead to premature senescence of the gingival epithelium, paving way to pathogenic oral diseases. Source: http://www.impactjournals.com/oncotarget/index.php?journal=oncotarget&page=article&op=view&path[]=718&path[]=1089

This is just one of the revered articles from Oncotarget that has sparked various debates in the dental and general medical practitioners circles. Oncotarget is open to both doctors and any individual who wishes to source their information provided they give the correct citation of the author and credit the online journal as well. All past and present journals on oncology and other fields in medicine are archived on the online journal and available for access anytime.

Review a publishing via Oncotarget on Impact Journals

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